Monday, May 17, 2010

Speaking of noses...

How much do I want this? Much much. I've been scoping it for the better part of two years, since Lizbon linked me to the one she wanted.

I have gotten two emails from the owner of Body Matters Gold, both with coupon codes for percentages off. The first code was for 10% off: "TXT10". The second was for 15: "TXT15". So what I'm wondering is, if I go through the checkout and put in "TXT50" will I get it for half price?

Embarking on a new sweater today. This one is a knockoff for my niece, who showed it to her Mum on the Gap website, calling it her 'dream sweater'. Sadly the sizing was all wrong for her, so her Mum couldn't buy it, but I've decided to come to her rescue.



I need some simple knitting because things have taken a decided turn for the worse. Sandy is so very, very sick. This week I'll be with her on Wednesday and Friday, just spending the day sitting with her while her husband is at work and the kids are at school. She can't be alone in the house.

Knitting figures largely in our history. I want to knit while I'm there because it comforts her. I can be in her room for hours and she doesn't feel like she has to talk to me, because I have something to do.

So, the yarn will be Loyal superwash wool, with the colourwork done in (probably) Lanett. I'll use Ann Budd's handy book for the basic sweater, and add the colourwork bands when the body is completed. I haven't decided whether to knit the bands first and seam them, or pick up and knit them from the body stitches. I'll do as the spirit moves.

And as much as this distraction will also comfort me, as well as Sandy, I'm afraid it can only help me so much. When push comes to shove...I'm lost. I don't know how to lose a friend. I think the handbook for that might turn out to be short: muddle through as best you can.

13 comments:

Geek Knitter said...

So much of life seems to be based on muddling through.

My heart goes out to you and to Sandy. I wish there were more I could do.

Valerie said...

I'm so sorry for your friend and you. Good for you to have the courage and compassion to be there...a lot of so called friends bolt, not wanting to deal with their own discomfort.

Elizabeth Berg has written several fiction books on the topic. One I remember is Talk Before Sleep. I read it when I lost a friend to breast cancer a dozen or so years ago.

bless you...

kate said...

Ah, my dear. Knit a beautiful sweater. Comfort your friend and yourself with each stitch.

I'm here. Call anytime.

Brenda said...

So sorry to hear about Sandy, thinking of you lots and praying that God will grant you strength as you are there for your friend.

Emily said...

Don't know what to say beyond my heart hurts for you & your friend. Supportive thoughts headed your way.

Kristine said...

Prayers for you and for Sandy and for Sandy's family. And so very much love, and some long-ass-distance hugs.

Cynthia said...

There really isn't much I can say, but I'll be thinking of you and of Sandy.

lizbon said...

a) I love it that you consider that sweater a simple knit. For me, it would not be a simple knit. I'd frown over the hood all day even without the colorwork added to it. And button bands, gah.

b) Sad. Sad. Sad. Sad. Sad. I'm sure you're right. There's no good way to lose a friend. There's not even a tolerable one. Sucks.

c) I do like the image of you sitting there knitting with her, though. I wonder if part of what she likes about it is the sound.

d) Dude, coupons! Where was I? I'm on that mailing list and I missed out. Sigh. Guess I need another one.

mel said...

Strength to you. You don't have to know how - being there is the greatest gift... xoxo

Dave Hingsburger said...

Knit, Knit, Knit away ... it doesn't matter what you are doing with your hands, being there for her is an act of the heart and that's what's important.

Baba Yaga said...

Yes, it usually boils down to muddling through. That's more of an art than anyone admits.

Muddling through, and allowing other people to give the little bits of comfort they can, and keeping sight of small delights even in the dark times. Mothers, in my experience, tend to come out ahead, because they will not let the small things fall apart.

And knowing that one has done what was needful. Being with isn't a universal gift, or one that is universally practised. Being with and knitting is a gift with a light touch.

Susie Hewer said...

I'm so sorry to hear your sad news. There are no words to make it better. Just being there will be a wonderful comfort for Sandy.

In a strange way, the seemingly mundane act of sitting quietly and knitting assumes tremendous importance in such situations. When my dad passed away, my mum and I sat together later and did a crossword. It was a 'normal' thing to do in completely abnormal circumstances.

There is no handbook for this and there is no right way to behave or feel.

God bless you all.

Rachel said...

I don't think anyone knows how to lose someone they love...and it certainly doesn't get any easier the more losses one deals with. All we can do is be there and not hide from the pain. Which, it seems, is exactly what you are doing. Thinking of you both.